This Month at St. Mark


Birthdays This Month

Recognizing our congregation members who were born this month...

Oct 01

Hope Pottorff

Lawrence Wise

Ocy 02

Sheri Fox

Oct 03

Carol Reese

Adam Warehime

Oct 04

Michael Brown

Donna Kuhn

Bruce Wilson

Oct 05

Donna Bell

Nancy Bittinger

Hilda Pfaff

Kimberly Zinn

Oct 06

Brock Luckabaugh

     Happy Birthday!

Oct 09

Gary Laabs

Oct 10

Karen Crawford

Sharon Glass

Oct 11

Ed Goucker, Jr.

Oct 15

Carol Pado

Oct 16

Vance Stabley

Jay Tome

Oct 17

Patricia Hagarman

Oct 18

Susan Potter

Pr. Jerry Smith

Oct 20

Lois VandenHeuvel

Oct 21

Amanda Alvarez

Oct 22

Joshua Leppo

Oct 23

Barb Smith

Oct 25

Kyle Garman

Oct 26

Rebecca Bingel

Joan Frock

McHenze Wildasin

Oct 27

Dylan Zeyn

Oct 29

Marion Miller

Nancy Mummert

Oct 31

Nancy Fridinger

If you ever see that we miss a birthday or overlook a name, please contact the office at 717-637-8904 so wwe can update our computer record.

Page Footnotes

 

You have probably noticed the red boxes at the bottom of several pages (Welcome to St. Mark, Outreach Mission, Spiritual Growth Mission, and Stewards of Blessing Mission). In these small spaces, we will post information about many facets (history, etc.) of the church and the Bible. The subjects and information promises to be quite varied. But, all will be enlightening and fun. If you want to check them out, click the Start at Welcome Page link.

 

This Month, in the red boxes are some interesting facts about Lutheranism. 

Spotlight on Apostles & Saints

This month, we highlight the apostle Simon, known as Simon the Zealot, one of the original twelve.

Simon

Simon was surnamed the Zealot for his rigid adherence to the Jewish law and to the Canaanite law. He was one of the original followers of Christ. Western tradition is that he preached in Egypt and then went to Persia with St. Jude, where both suffered martyrdom. Eastern tradition says Simon died peacefully at Edessa. His feast day is October 28th. (Source: http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=241)

 

From  this source: http://christianity.about.com/od/newtestamentpeople/a/JZ-Simon-The-Zealot.htm we have the following description.

Simon the Zealot, one of Jesus Christ's 12 apostles, is a mystery character in the Bible. We have one tantalizing bit of information about him, which has led to ongoing debate among Bible scholars.


In some versions of the Bible (Amplified Bible), he is called Simon the Cananaean. In the King James Version and New King James Version, he is called Simon the Canaanite or Cananite. In the English Standard Version, New American Standard Bible,New International Version, and New Living Translation he is called Simon the Zealot.


To confuse things further, Bible scholars argue over whether Simon was a member of the radical Zealot party or whether the term simply referred to his religious zeal. Those who take the former view think Jesus may have chosen Simon, a member of the tax-hating, Roman-hating Zealots, to counterbalance Matthew, a former tax collector and employee of the Roman empire. Those scholars say such a move by Jesus would have shown that his kingdom reaches out to people in all walks of life.


Scripture tells us almost nothing about Simon. In the Gospels, he is mentioned in three places, but only to list his name with the 12 disciples. In Acts 1:13 we learn that he was present with the 11 apostles in the upper room of Jerusalem after Christ had ascended to heaven. (Source: http://christianity.about.com/od/newtestamentpeople/a/JZ-Simon-The-Zealot.htm)

Notable People This Month

Each month we introduce people or things that are notable for us Lutherans. Some will be saints. Some will be recognized as having made other significant contributions. Some will be interesting seasonal information.


This month we present Jude/Thaddeus who was a traveling companion of Simon.

St. Jude, known as Thaddaeus, was a brother of St. James the Less, and a relative of Our Saviour. He was one of the 12 Apostles of Jesus and his attribute is a club. Images of St. Jude often include a flame around his head, which represent his presence at Pentecost, when he accepted the Holy Spirit alongside the other apostles. Another attribute is St. Jude holding an image of Christ, in the Image of Edessa.

Sometimes he can also be seen holding a carpenter's ruler or is depicted with a scroll or book, the Epistle of Jude.


Biblical scholars agree St. Jude was a son of Clopas and his mother Mary was the Virgin Mary's cousin. Ancient writers tell us that he preached the Gospel in Judea, Samaria, Idumaea, Syria, Mesopotamia, and Lybia. According to Eusebius, he returned to Jerusalem in the year 62, and assisted at the election of his brother, St. Simeon, as Bishop of Jerusalem.


Saint Jude is not the same person as Judas Iscariot, who betrayed Our Lord and despaired because of his great sin and lack of trust in God's mercy.


Jude was the one who asked Jesus at the Last Supper why He would not manifest Himself to the whole world after His resurrection. Little else is known of his life. Legend claims that he visited Beirut and Edessa and could have been martyred with St. Simon in Persia.

He is an author of an epistle (letter) to the Churches of the East, particularly the Jewish converts, directed against the heresies of the Simonians, Nicolaites, and Gnostics. Though Saint Gregory the Illuminator has been credited as the "Apostle to the Armenians," the Apostles Jude and Bartholomew are believed to have brought Christianity to Armenia, where Jude was rumored to have later been martyred.


There is some debate about where Jude died, though most Biblical scholars agree he was martyred. He is believed to have been martyred either in Armenia or Beirut.


Following his death, St. Jude's body was brought to Rome and left in a crypt in St. Peter's Basilica. Today his bones can be found in the left transept of St. Peter's Basilica under the main altar of St. Joseph in a tomb he shares with the remains of the apostle Simon the Zealot.

Pilgrims came to St. Jude's grave to pray and many reported a powerful intercession, leading to the title, "The Saint for the Hopeless and the Despaired." Two Saints, St. Bridget of Sweden and St. Bernard, had visions from God asking them to accept St. Jude as "The Patron Saint of the Impossible."


Roman Catholics invoke St. Jude when in desperate situations because his New Testament letter stresses that the faithful should persevere in the environment of harsh, difficult circumstances -just as their forefathers had done before them; therefore, he is the patron saint of desperate cases.

Source: http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=127



St. Jude is the Patron Saint of Hope and impossible causes and one of Jesus’ original twelve Apostles. He preached the Gospel with great passion, often in the most difficult circumstances. Through the power of the Holy Spirit, he made profound differences in people’s lives as he offered them the Word of God.


The Gospel tells us that St. Jude was a brother of St. James the Less, also one of the Apostles. They are described in the Gospel of Matthew as the “brethren” of Jesus, probably cousins.


St. Jude is traditionally depicted carrying the image of Jesus in his hand. This recalls one of his miracles during his work spreading the Word of God. King Abagar of Edessa asked Jesus to cure him of leprosy and sent an artist to bring him a drawing of Jesus. Impressed with Abagar’s great faith, Jesus pressed His face on a cloth, leaving the image of His face on it. He gave the cloth to St. Jude, who took the image to Abagar and cured him.


After the death and resurrection of Jesus, St. Jude traveled throughout Mesopotamia, Libya, and Persia with St. Simon preaching and building up the foundations of the early Church.


St. Jude died a martyr’s death for his unwavering faith. His body was later brought to Rome and placed in a crypt under St. Peter's Basilica.


After his death, many turned to St. Jude for his intercession in prayer. Jesus inspired the devotion to St. Jude for St. Bridget of Sweden when he directed her in a vision to turn to St. Jude with great faith and confidence. In a vision, Christ told St. Bridget, “In accordance with his surname, Thaddeus, the amiable or loving, he will show himself most willing to give help.”

Source: http://www.shrineofstjude.org/site/PageServer?pagename=ssj_jude_life


Do You Know

This month's quiz asks you to spot the Lutheran hymnists or musicians in the list of notable Lutherans.

How many can you correctly identify?

 

The answers can be seen by clicking the Show Me... button below.

Which of these notable Lutherans are reknowned for their music (hymns or other music)? Hint: There are four imposters in the list.

Johann S. Bach

George Bennard

Albert Brumley

Thomas Chisholm

Fanny Crosby

Rudolph Featherstone

George F. Handel

Werner Heisenberg

Wll Herzfield

Stuart Hine

Martin Luther

Philip Melanchthon

James Murray

Charles Wesley


If you have trouble, click Show Me the Answers.